Caribbean Plate


Arenal - KP

World Map
external image C:%5CDOCUME%7E1%5CKATELY%7E1%5CLOCALS%7E1%5CTemp%5Cmsohtml1%5C01%5Cclip_image002.jpgKPArenal_World_Map.jpg
Volcano Data
Volcano Name:
Arenal Volcano
Location:
Costa Rica
Tectonic Plate:
Caribbean plate and Cocos plate (Convergent)
Height:
1,657 meters (5,437 feet)
Type of Volcano:
Strato/Composite Volcano
Rock type of lava:
Basaltic andesite
Setting:
Lush with lots of grass and thick woodlands. Bordered closely by the beautiful and scenic Arenal Lake.
Date of Last Eruption:
Currently active (as of 2009)
Type of Last Eruption:
Pyroclastic flow and lots of chronic mediocre sized eruptions.
Detailed map
external image C:%5CDOCUME%7E1%5CKATELY%7E1%5CLOCALS%7E1%5CTemp%5Cmsohtml1%5C01%5Cclip_image004.jpgKPArenal_Detailed_Map.jpg
Typical Eruption:
The typical eruption of this volcano consists of lava effusion and in many cases pyroclastic flow. The eruptions are typically small and cause heavy lava flow through the vents of the summit. The lava from this volcano moves in a pulsating pattern then eventually forms a crusty magma that flows over the crater rim. The lava is not viscous and flows very easily.
Topographic Map
external image C:%5CDOCUME%7E1%5CKATELY%7E1%5CLOCALS%7E1%5CTemp%5Cmsohtml1%5C01%5Cclip_image006.jpgKPArenal_Topographic_Map.JPG
http://www.earthtools.org/
Hazards:
There are many hazards to the Arenal volcano of Costa Rica. Inhabitants in the area should be aware of any pyroclastic flow, strombolian eruptions, lava avalanches, and hyper- concentrated stream- flows so they can get out of the area quickly if any of these occur while the volcano is active. Using new technology, scientists can determine when a volcano will erupt and possibly how large the eruption will be.
Citations for information in MLA style:

http://www.volcanolive.com/arenal.html
http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1405-033
http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Volcanoes/CostaRica/description_costa_rica_volcanoes.html

Cerro Negro - JR

World Mapexternal image C:%5CDOCUME%7E1%5CJASMIN%7E1%5CLOCALS%7E1%5CTemp%5Cmsohtml1%5C01%5Cclip_image002.jpg
JRWorld_Map.jpg


Volcano Data
Volcano Name:
Cerro Negro
Location:
León Department, Nicaragua in Central America
Tectonic Plate:
Convergent
Height:
2,214 feet
Type of Volcano:
Cinder cone
Rock type of lava:
Basalt
Setting:
subduction
Date of Last Eruption:
August 1999
Type of Last Eruption:
Ash emission and lava fountain. Small- scale eruption.


Detailed map
JRDetailed_map.jpg

external image C:%5CDOCUME%7E1%5CJASMIN%7E1%5CLOCALS%7E1%5CTemp%5Cmsohtml1%5C01%5Cclip_image004.jpg
Typical Eruption:
Cerro Negro is a very active. It is a cinder cone volcano. I think that Cerro Negro is granitic. Its eruptions are part lava, part tephra, with lots of ash size tephra. Cerro Negro's basaltic lavas have water contents of up to 6%. These very high water contents make the eruptions very explosive. Cerro Negro's eruptions commonly occur in clusters that coincide with tectonic earthquakes. It is at a convergent plate. The viscosity is very high making it more explosive.




Topographic Map
JRTopo_Map.GIF



external image C:%5CDOCUME%7E1%5CJASMIN%7E1%5CLOCALS%7E1%5CTemp%5Cmsohtml1%5C01%5Cclip_image006.jpg

Hazards: Volcanoes can be ruthless destroyers. Volcanic processes have liberated gases of the atmosphere and water in our lakes and oceans from the rocks deep beneath Earth's surface. There are three main groups of volcanic events that pose major hazards: Group 1 comprises several types of explosive volcanic eruptions. Group 2 includes nonexplosive volcanic activity. Group 3 comprises chiefly lahars. University of South Florida is monitoring volcanoes in Nicaragua. (Masaya, Telica, Cerro Negro). Monitoring stations were installed on the volcanoes. Profiles were collected on the volcanoes.

Citations for information in MLA style:
http://kong.lib.usf.edu:8881/R/87V4VF87U3R6KT3EXKULCYLXY8Y3J6PA5XEHQINJDMLBYDU7GF00925?func=dbinjumpfull&object_id=111807&local_base=GEN01&pds_handle=GUEST
http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/vwdocs/volc_images/south_america/cerro_negro.html
http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~carr/fieldtrip/fieldtext/cerro_negro_fldtxt.htm

Isla Zacate Grande - NV

World Map (insert world map here) with citation (URL)

NVWorld_Map.jpg

Google Earth

Volcano Data
Volcano Name:
Isla Zacate Grande
Location:
Honduras
Tectonic Plate:
Caribbean Plate
Height:
640+ m
Type of Volcano:
Stratovolcano
Rock type of lava:
Basaltic
Setting:
Subduction Zone
Date of Last Eruption:
Unknown
Type of Last Eruption:
Unknown



Detailed map (insert detailed map here) with citation (URL)
NVDetailed_Map.jpg

Google Earth

Typical Eruption: (type your description below) – you may include an eruption map with citation (URL)



http://ericfdiaz.webs.com/stratovolcano.htm

The typical eruption for a stratovolcano is very deadly. When it erupts, they have discontinuous lava flows, volcanic mudflows (lahars), pyroclastic flows, airfall tephra, and/or debris flows. Sometimes, there is a great sound that can be heard thousands of miles away. What happens is, since the magma is so thick, all of the gases underneath can’t escape, and what happens after that, is that the pressure mounts, until it dangerously explodes. The power of these stratavolcanoes is so great, that in one eruption, the predicted amount of power was equal to 13,000 Hiroshima bombs. They call the eruptions, Plinian. When at times, so much magma is thrown into the air, the walls of the volcano can not hold any longer, so they fall, and the volcano is then called a caldera. Once, what had happened with such a vicious fall, a tsunami formed and killed many people. Another thing is that when all of that pressure and tephra are first released, they are so heavy, that the whole mass drops back down. In doing so, it pushes whatever is at the top of the “mouth” of the volcano, outwards and down the sides of it.

Topographic Map (insert topographic map here) with citation (URL)
NVTopographic_Map.JPG

NVtopomap.JPG

http://www.earthtools.org/

Hazards: (type your description below)

There is a small village of people on the North-eastern side of the volcano. Since no record has been shown that a previous explosion has happened, this volcano can’t be judged. What some other stratovolcanoes have dealt with for hazards are: discontinuous lava flows, volcanic mudflows (lahars), pyroclastic flows, airfall tephra, and/or debris flows, tsunamis and great amounts of power. Any of these could occur and potentially threaten the lives of many–who live on the same island of this volcano.

Other important events that can happen if a stratovolcano erupts, is that because of all the gases and ashes that are put into the air, the climate can change around the eruption site. For example, in June 1991, after the Mount Pinatubo temperatures were a little bit colder around the entire world. Also affected were the sunsets and sunrises, in being more beautiful. The reason behind the colder temperatures was that the great amounts of sulfur gases from the explosion were sent in clouds around the earth, not allowing some of the sun’s light to penetrate into our atmosphere. Other hazards are air travel. As with any explosion, ash can ruin any form of transportation going through, over, or near the volcano. Pyroclastic flows that form are very quick masses of burning gases, debris, and ashes that come out of stratovolcanic eruptions. A lava flow is a running amount of lava that flows down a volcano. A debris flow is very similar except that what’s flowing is instead, debris. Mud flows or lahars are a concoction of water and debris from the explosion. They run down the volcano very quickly and are very hazardous. Tephra is volcanic debris that is thrown into the air during a stratovolcanic eruption. Tsunamis are large waves that form when the land shakes and sometimes happen with volcanoes. These are all very dangerous occurrences that are to be taken very seriously with a stratovolcanic eruption.


Citations for information in MLA style:
Diaz, Eric F.. "Stratovolcano." Eric Diaz's Cosmos. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://ericfdiaz.webs.com/stratovolcano.htm>.
"EarthTools - Find places, latitude/longitude, sunrise/sunset, elevation, local time and time zones." EarthTools - Find places, latitude/longitude, sunrise/sunset, elevation, local time and time zones. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://earthtools.org>.
"FEMA for Kids: Tsunami." Federal Emergency Management Agency. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.fema.gov/kids/tsunami.htm>.
"How Volcanoes Work - Stratovolcanoes." SDSU - Department of Geological Sciences. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.geology.sdsu.edu/how_volcanoes_work/stratovolc_page.html>.
"How Volcanoes Work - Stratovolcanoes." SDSU - Department of Geological Sciences. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.geology.sdsu.edu/how_volcanoes_work/stratovolc_page.html>.
"Interactives. Dynamic Earth. Plates & Boundaries." Teacher Professional Development and Teacher Resources by Annenberg Media. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.learner.org/interactives/dynamicearth/plate.html>.
Region. "Global Volcanism Program | Volcanoes of the World." Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program: Worldwide Holocene Volcano and Eruption Information. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/>.
"Stratovolcano: Facts, Discussion Forum, and Encyclopedia Article." AbsoluteAstronomy.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Stratovolcano>.
"Volcanoes of the World - John Seach." Volcano Live, John Seach. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Nov. 2009. <http://www.volcanolive.com/world.html>.

Izalco - SN

World Map (insert world map here) with citation (URL)
SNworld_view.GIF

Volcano Data
Volcano Name:
Izalco
Location:
El Salvador, North America
Tectonic Plate:
Caribbean plate
Height:
1950 Meters
Type of Volcano:
Stratovolcano
Rock type of lava:
Basaltic, andesitic
Setting:
Subduction Zone, Pacific, central America
Date of Last Eruption:
1966
Type of Last Eruption:
Lava flow
Detailed map (insert detailed map here) with citation (URL)
SNdetailed_map.GIF

Typical Eruption: (type your description below) – you may include an eruption map with citation (URL)
The volcano Izalco has two different types of eruptions. It has explosive eruptions with pyroclastic flows, and others, with runny lava flows. This is a good example of a volcano on a seduction zone, with a good amount of silica content in some of the flows. The runny ones are of basaltic content, low in silica, and the others are andesitic, with higher silica content. These latter ones are much more viscous. The Basaltic eruption would have a wide range of lave flow, but would only affect the area in the immediate vicinity of the volcano. The andesitic eruptions would be explosive, and shoot out tephra that could cover a much larger area.

Topographic Map (insert topographic map here) with citation (URL)
SNtopo.gif
“iztopo.gof” Michigan Tech. web. 11 Nov. 2009
http://www.geo.mtu.edu/volcanoes/central_america/el_salvador/izalco/images/iztopo.gif#

Hazards: (type your description below)
The volcano has hazards associated with this volcano are varied, but not all that extreme. If you are on the volcano, or very near it, there is danger from pyroclastic and lava flows. Other wise the only real danger in a lava flow from this volcano is a small earthquake hazard, and a threat of some small tephra settling. The volcano’s explosive eruption on the other hand could be more hazardous. Some people could be in danger from falling tephra, as could planes flying overhead.

Citations for information in MLA style:

“Volcano Database” Thinkquest. Web. 11 Nov. 2009. <http://library.thinkquest.org/17457/volcanoesdb/?action=volcano&volcanoID=130>

Seach, John. “Izalco Volcano, El Salvador – John Seach” Volcano live Web. 11 Nov. 2009
<http://www.volcanolive.com/izalco.html>

“Global Volcanism Program Izalco Summary” Global Volcanism Project. Web. 11 Nov. 2009.
<http://volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1403-03=>

Pele - BR

World Map (insert world map here) with citation (URL)
BRworld_image.jpg


Volcano Data
Volcano Name:
Mt. Pele
Location:
Martinique
Tectonic Plate:
Caribbean plate
Height:
4,583
Type of Volcano:
Stratovolcano
Rock type of lava:
pryoclastic
Setting:
Tectonic plate
Date of Last Eruption:
1929, 1902
Type of Last Eruption:
hot volcanic ash and gases

Detailed map (insert detailed map here) with citation (URL)
BRclose_image.jpg

Typical Eruption: (type your description below) – you may include an eruption map with citation (URL)
A typical eruption for Mt.Pelee is the volcano explodes, of course, what the type "lava" (its really made out of ash and super heated gasses) its made out of is pryoclastic. When it explodes it shoots out hot ash, super heated gasses and thick clouds of sulfurous gas. The ash and the super heated gases were once measured at 100 miles per hour, so the gases could come out that fast. The sulfurous gasses kill people instantly. What also happens when the volcano explodes is mud comes off the slope of the volcano and starts like a mud slide down the slope of the volcano. Rocks usually get blasted of the volcano because of the power of the explosion of the volcano. Another thing that would happen in a usual eruption is boiling water could come down the slope of the mountain, because the crater lake Etang Sec on the slope of the volcano can heat up and then when the volcano bursts it come rushing down the mountain. The explosive nature of the volcano is because it on a plate subduction and plate boundary. The volcano produces pumice so that means that volcano produces magma thats high in silica.

Topographic Map (insert topographic map here) with citation (URL)
BRpele_topo.GIF


Hazards: (type your description below)
Some hazards that come with Mt. Pelee erupting is the volcano shoots out hot ash, shoots out hot ash, super heated gasses and thick clouds of sulfurous gas that can kill in an instant if come in contact with them. If you breathe in the sulfurous gas it burn your lungs and you will instantly die. The ash and the super heated gasses that shoots out can travel at 100 mph, and that hurricane force, the ash can destroy buildings. Before the volcano explodes it heats up, an when the volcano heats up it heats the crater lake Etang Sec and when it explodes it forces the water down the side of the volcano. When the crater lake go’s down the hill it can cause mud slides that can take out buildings an d villages. Rocks can get shot out of the volcano when it explodes and get launched for large distances. Another hazard is kind of unusual but it happened before, before volcano explodes it has little explosions and usually when that happens it shoots out sulfurous and other gasses so when those gases come out, the animals flee down the away from the volcano, if the animals get away from the volcano and go down the town the might get startled and hurt the people in the villages.
Citations for information in MLA style:

Volcano Project